Tag Archives: newbury

Wendy Bramham Therapy on BBC Radio Wiltshire

Wendy Bramham Therapy has contributed their expertise about mental health on BBC Wiltshire in 2013 and again recently.

In March 2016 we were asked to contribute to a discussion about whether time is a healer.  One of our team, Briony Martin, stepped into the breach to discuss this topic with radio presenter Graham Seaman.  Listen here

In 2013, when BBC Wilts presenter, Mark O’Donnell, suffered a panic attack in the streets of Swindon – and found that people gave him a wide berth! – he decided to try to break down the myths, fears and stigma surrounding mental health, by talking about it on the radio!

BBC Wiltshire - Bipolar programme September 2013

In the studio L to R: David Lathan (Richmond Fellowship), Wendy Bramham, Denise (bipolar sufferer) and Mark O’Donnell

Wendy Bramham gave professional insights and advice on this series of 7 programmes, which covered the following topics:

Unfortunately all the recordings have been lost except for the one on suicide – listen here.

However, following each programme, Wendy wrote self-help resources for listeners who would like to learn more.  Read more by clicking on the links above for each topic.

 

Wendy Bramham
April 2016

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Sir Richard Bowlby – “a rare and special opportunity” in 2014

Rachel Cooper, psychotherapist at Wendy Bramham Therapy in Newbury, reviews our recent day on attachment theory with Sir Richard Bowlby:

“Hearing Sir Richard speak at the recent Wendy Bramham seminar in Newbury felt a rare and special opportunity to get up close and personal with his father, Sir John Bowlby’s, pioneering work.

Richard highlighted the significance of attachment theory by taking us back to the fright we each felt when we got lost (and separated from our caregiver) as a child, even though we were not in any danger; caused by the terror of separation from an attachment figure. He also reminded us of its ongoing impact on all relationships held as adults and explained how he himself developed a secure attachment as an adult through his relationship with his wife.

Sir Richard Bowlby and Wendy BramhamSir Richard with Wendy Bramham

Richard provided an updated slant with research and views, sparking stimulating debates that ranged from the science of epigenetics to the art of using attachment theory creatively and individually within psychotherapy. Also the despair caused by the lack of influence of attachment theory on politician’s agenda within schooling, versus the hope from a psychotherapist providing a reliable, responsive, helpful and empathic secure base from which clients can begin to explore in a way that has previously been too scary. I loved Richard’s description of a psychotherapist being, “someone to hold our hand while we go into scary places”.

Richard was such an engaging speaker through his warm, humorous and down to earth style. His sharing of personal experiences with his upbringing and own family really brought the theory to life. A really engaging, enlightening and informative event.”

newburytherapy.com/rachel-cooper-therapist-newbury.php

What is Mindfulness?

Mindfulness is  paying attention, on purpose and with acceptance, to direct experience as it is.  It is not a concept but a practice, and its benefits can only be gained through regular, formal practice.  Mindfulness has always been a part of the ancient Buddhist meditation traditions, but has been developed recently into a more secular approach and used in various psychological therapies, for example to help with stress reduction.

Mindfulness is an important resource and life-skill for everyone because it helps regulate stress, promotes positive mood, supports the immune system and increases our ability to concentrate.  Above all, it helps us to accept “what is”, enabling us to become curious rather than anxious, and so enabling us to respond more creatively, rather than reacting or behaving in “auto pilot”, driven by old beliefs or habits.

We learned in our recent seminar with Margaret Landale that, as therapists, one of the best ways to “teach” clients is to model it through our own mindfulness practice – to “embody” mindfulness ourselves – which will then be communicated non-verbally to our clients.  Margaret says: “Communication is determined by sensory and felt experience.  The client will subconsciously respond to the therapist’s facial expression, eye contact, tone of voice and body posture/language. Language arises from a deep level of relational attunement”.

Margaret’s style, delivery and content were all excellent and we received extremely positive feedback from our attendees.  We all enjoyed her enthusiastic, informative and gentle approach to learning new techniques.  Best of all, I now have a much more accessible key to my own meditation practice which, prior to the workshop, had been tentative at best and quite often non-existent.  We look forward to part 2 when we will be applying mindfulness to helping our clients with complex trauma.

by: Wendy Bramham

What’s love got to do with it?

Jo Turner, our relationship therapist, writes:

Sometimes we feel the pressure of conforming with all things love related… when we actually feel that our relationship is affecting our well being.

Suppressing feelings and thoughts about our partners can sometimes lead to a slow build up of unresolved and unwanted emotions which can turn into resentment. Why do we feel unfulfilled? What do we want from our significant other? What do we want for ourselves?

Making space and time to talk together in a safe, confidential environment can help us to make sense of our relationship.

The quality of your life, is the quality of your relationships – Anthony Robbins.

Jo Turner
Relationship Therapist

Counselling and psychotherapy in West Berkshire and Wiltshire
PG Dip. Mar. Th. MBACP (Accred.)

Valentine blues

Friday 14th February – Valentine’s Day – can bring up difficult feelings for many of us, whether we are on our own or in a relationship. We place a huge amount of importance on our romantic attachments but they can also bring us a great deal of pain. Therapy is an opportunity to reflect on why we are as we are in relationships, what baggage we are bringing from the past and what we really want and need. Talking therapy can also help couples who are struggling to communicate.

Are you drinking too much?

Excess stress and strain can lead us to drink too much. Drinking numbs our feelings and distracts our thoughts. Lots of people who come into therapy have a problem with drinking, and, like any addiction, a talking treatment can really help. At the clinic we have a specialist counsellor – Briony Martin –  experienced in working with problem drinking. Our approach is to help clients work out what underlies their drinking and find a better way to deal with those deeper issues and feelings. Being able to talk to someone objective, non-judgemental and supportive can make all the difference.
brionyjmartin@hotmail.co.uk